Kayak Nepal

Called by many “The Roof of the World”, Nepal is home to many of the planet’s highest mountains and that also means some of the highest runnable white water too. It’s an irresistible challenge for four kayakers led by Dave Kwant, travelling the world in search of the toughest, highest, remotest, most full-on and unpaddled white water. They’ve come to the Annapurna Range to tackle the upper reaches of the Marsyangdi River. It’s Class 4, Class 5 rapids almost all the way. But before they get there it’s a five hour bus ride and a 48 kilometre trek in over crumbling roads and tortuous mountain...
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Diving the World

(Introducing Monty Halls) For most divers it’s an impossible dream. To explore ten of the world’s best dive sites in one expedition. To travel from the warm waters of the Pacific to the cold currents of the Atlantic, swimming with dolphins, rays and sharks, taking scuba diving to its limits in search of fresh experiences, the thrill that comes from diving into the unknown. One of the world’s top dive adventurers, Monty Halls, has decided to make that dream a reality. Together with a small band of skilled divers he will spend ten weeks circling the world visiting the tropical island paradises of Palau and Yap, the Great Barrier Reef and New Zealand’s Poor Knights Islands, the Galapagos, Belize and the Little Bahamas Banks, finishing up in Africa with Lake Malawi, Aliwal Shoal and the marine reserve of Dyer Island where they will meet the awesome great white shark. Here is a short clip. You can follow the link at the end if you wish to view the entire...
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Canyoning Borneo

One of the greatest challenges in canyoning Lows Gully plunges down the side of Mount Kinabalu in northern Borneo. In the space of a few kilometres it drops some 10,000 feet, 3000 metres to the Panataran River. In the gully a series of deep pools and over forty waterfalls form a giant staircase cut into the granite. In 1994 a British Army expedition had to be rescued from the Gully starving and near death. Now a group of Flemish canyoneers led by Paul Symons are attempting to be the first to descend the Gully using the pull-through technique, taking their ropes with them as they go. But there’s a constant threat of rain sending flash floods through the gully, trapping the...
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Paragliding Ethiopia

Ethiopia: Africa’s most mountainous country, where deep rocky ravines, high plateaux, empty skies and scorching sun provide the perfect conditions for a paragliding adventure. One of the world’s top paragliding instructors, Bob Drury, and two friends, fellow instructor Innes Powell and Sanskrit scholar Jim Mallinson, travel to Addis Ababa planning to soar the ridge of the Great Rift Valley north to the Simien Mountains and Ethiopia’s highest mountain Ras Dashan. But the last thing they expected, rain, disrupts their plans. Forced to drive north to the ancient town of Lalibela, they make it their base for a series of flights out into the mountains, soaring up to cloudbase at 15000 feet and surviving a frightening crash out in the...
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Kiteskiing Greenland

Precipitous mountains and virgin snow, vast glaciers and clear arctic air, Greenland is one of the ultimate destinations for adventure skiers and snowboarders. Now snowboard mountaineer John Griber is taking three of the world’s leading skiers and snowboarders: Chris Figenshau, Jim Zellers and Kasha Rigby, into the wilderness. Their plan is to explore the Karale Glacier, making first descents of the numerous unnamed peaks in this remote region and kite skiing across the glacier itself at speeds of 40 kilometres an hour and more. But hanging over John is the memory of two close brushes with death in the last year, losing two companions on Mount Saint Elias and nearly losing his own life on Cho Oyuin in the...
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Horseriding Namibia

Africa’s Namib Desert, believed to be the oldest desert in the world it’s home to snakes, scorpions and the world’s only wild desert dwelling horses. Now two young British women, Tanya Waters and Sarah Jane Gaselee, and their Namibian guide, Bettina Frank-Schultz, plan to be the first women to ride across the Namib from Duwisib Castle to the Diamond Coast. They’ll be following a route believed to have been taken by the ancestors of the wild horses when they escaped from the stud farm at Duwisib during the First World War. They’ll be travelling 400 kilometres, crossing deserts, dunes and dusty planes and entering the so-called Forbidden Zone where ruined ghost towns stand as a reminder of the diamond rush that swept the area almost a century...
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